AGNI (THE FIRE)

Closing Bid: S$ 850.00

OPEN DATE: 10 May 2014, 10:00am
CLOSING DATE: 27 June 2014, 8:30pm

About the Artwork

For Kanchana Gupta's Büffel entitled Agni (fire) she has chosen to represent the theme of fire on the Büffel figurine using oil paint. Gupta has built layers of paint on the surface, using various colours of fire - ranging from soothing lights tones to darker ones to create the duality of tranquility as well as energy of a volcano. Fire is a symbol of destruction as well as rebirth / renewal and it has been an important part of Gupta's painting process where the transformation of layers of oil paint destroyed over the course of weeks through fire, invites a meditative response: viewing calm in the face of beauty that has been ravaged.

Bidding Information

OPEN DATE: 10 MAY 2014
CLOSING DATE: 27 JUNE 2014

Closing Bid: S$ 850.00

About the Artist

Singaporean artist Kanchana Gupta was a Management Professional by training, but wanted to pursue a career in art after working for eleven years in various Indian and multinational corporations. She completed a Diploma in Fine Arts from Lasalle College of Arts in 2010 and has shown her works in a solo show and some group exhibitions. Her works are in private collections in Singapore, Australia, Indonesia and India. She has also been featured as an artist by Vasantham Central Channel for "India Beat" section, telecast on 1st May 2011.

Gupta has been experimenting with various series of abstract paintings for the last two years. She explains "her fascination with abstraction is influenced by her observation that abstract painting apparently refers only to the invisible, inner state or simply to itself". The process of many cycles of rupturing and tearing of the surfaces in her paintings explore narratives of irreversible repair in the emotional, physical and psychological realms. These form an almost lyrical expression, a meditative, energetic installation that allow viewers to connect with and sense the emotions behind these dynamic surfaces created by both a "violent and poetic process".